Seminar by Associate Professor Francois Barthelat

2017-11-16 12:15:00 2017-11-16 13:00:00 Europe/Helsinki Seminar by Associate Professor Francois Barthelat Dear HYBER members, you are welcome listen to a talk “Expanding material property space using bioinspiration and micro-architecture ” by Associate Professor Francois Barthelat in TU6 (TUAS) on Thu 16th Nov at 12.15 http://physics.aalto.fi/en/midcom-permalink-1e7c398822f9604c39811e79ec08daeda608d258d25 Otakaari 2, 02150, Espoo

Dear HYBER members, you are welcome listen to a talk “Expanding material property space using bioinspiration and micro-architecture ” by Associate Professor Francois Barthelat in TU6 (TUAS) on Thu 16th Nov at 12.15

16.11.2017 / 12:15 - 13:00

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Francois Barthelat obtained his PhD from Northwestern University in 2006 and is now Professor of Mechanical Engineering at McGill University. At McGill he founded the Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Bioinspiration, with the missions to identify key structures and mechanics of natural materials and to duplicate these features in novel high-performance engineering materials. Dr. Barthelat and his students have discovered new deformation and fracture mechanisms in bone, mollusk shells and fish scales. They have also pioneered new bioinspired materials and systems which they are now implementing in engineering applications: toughened glass for windows and touch screens, flexible scaled armor for industrial gloves, new ceramic composites for bone implants. The new bioinspired strategy he and his students recently developed to toughen glass was selected among the top ten scientific discovery in Quebec by the magazine Quebec Science in 2014. Dr. Barthelat serves on the editorial board of Scientific Reports, Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, Experimental Mechanics and Applied Mechanics Reviews.

 

Assoc. Professor Barthelat will act as the opponent in M.Sc.(tech) Tuukka Verho's defence on Fri 17th November.

 

Abstract of the talk

Architectured materials are characterized by structural features which are larger than what is typically considered microstructure (e.g. grains) but smaller than the size of the component. This class of materials includes lattice materials and foams, and also fully dense materials composed of building blocks of well-defined size and shape. While the deformations of the blocks typically remain small and within elastic limits, their interfaces can channel cracks and undergo large deformations. The building blocks of these materials can therefore slide, rotate, separate or interlock collectively, providing a wealth of tunable mechanisms and new pathways to extraordinary properties. Interestingly, nature is well ahead of engineers in terms of harnessing the concept of architecture in materials. For example in nacre and fish scales -two materials we have been studying in our group- the interplay between stiff building blocks and weaker nonlinear interfaces generates powerful combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness not yet found in synthetic materials. Duplicating these structures and mechanisms in engineering materials is very attractive, but fabrication still presents formidable challenges. Here I will discuss how we are using new fabrication strategies (three-dimensional laser engraving, 3D printing) to create architectured / bio-inspired materials with unusual and attractive combinations of properties: High stiffness and high toughness in nacre-like glasses and ceramics, hardness and flexural compliance in fish scale-inspired protective skins.