Seminar by Markus Müllner

2017-08-15 14:00:00 2017-08-15 15:15:00 Europe/Helsinki Seminar by Markus Müllner You are welcome to listen to a talk by Markus Müllner in lecture hall Ke2 (Kemistintie 1) on Tuesday 15th August at 14.15. http://physics.aalto.fi/en/midcom-permalink-1e77b48e58673d27b4811e7a8b92f2abf3cb4ccb4cc Kemistintie 1, 02150, Espoo

You are welcome to listen to a talk by Markus Müllner in lecture hall Ke2 (Kemistintie 1) on Tuesday 15th August at 14.15.

15.08.2017 / 14:00 - 15:15

The title of the talk is "Modular polymer particles for nano-bio investigations"

 

Abstract:

A rational and application-focused design of materials is expected to overcome many limitations in current materials and biomedical sciences. The possibility to precisely engineer at the nanoscale enables the synthesis of materials with tailored chemical composition and physicochemical properties. Advances in synthetic polymer science have further nourished the fabrication of highly functional and stimuli-responsive polymeric materials. Within this space, the modular synthesis of molecular polymer brushes, replica particles and capsules provide access to versatile materials that emerge as promising probes and delivery vehicles in nanomedicine.


Recently, we initiated studies to investigate the in vivo behaviour of molecular brushes to evaluate the impact of changes of particle design parameters on cell association as well as in vivo clearance, distribution and persistence. Fine control over particle properties enabled an initial investigation of the impact of size, aspect ratio and rigidity on the pharmacokinetic profile in a rat model. We have continued to develop molecular brushes for drug delivery of cytotoxic cargo release and deeper tumour penetration. The impact of changes to aspect ratio on accumulation in xenograft mice models have further revealed that nanoparticle shape may hold benefits over spherical counterparts.


In this seminar I will discuss the use of molecular brushes and polymer replica particles and their potential application in bio-applications.